huji Koret School of Veterinary Medicine

Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment,
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Dr. Neta Shlezinger

Host-pathogen interactions and fungal immunology

Koret School of Veterinary Medicine,
The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Environment,
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Office Address:
P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Phone: + 972-(0)3-9688538
Fax: +972-(0)3-9604079
Email Address: neta.shlezinger1@mail.huji.ac.il


Special interests

Fungal immunology, host-pathogen interactions, regulated cell death, microbiology


Professional Experience

2019-present Senior Lecturer, Koret School of Veterinary Medicine,
Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food, and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot.
2014-2019 Postdoctoral Fellow, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY.
2009-2014 Ph.D., George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University.
2007-2009 M.S., summa cum laude, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University.
2003-2006 B.S., George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University


Research

The global burden associated with human fungal pathogens is estimated at 1 billion infections and over 1.6 million deaths annually. This mortality rate is similar to that of tuberculosis and >3-fold more than malaria. The increasing burden of fungal disease in the world, together with the emergence of drug resistant organisms is an alarming challenge to medicine and human health.

The Shlezinger lab uses multidisciplinary approach to address two broad questions: what are the mechanisms that enable fungi to overcome immune surveillance and cause infectious diseases and, conversely, how the host immune response can protect against fungal pathogens. The projects in the lab address common questions in pathogenesis and immunology at the molecular, cellular and whole-organism level.

To decode these intricate interactions, we generate functional reporters of fungal physiology and apply cross-disciplinary single-cell analysis techniques to monitor the outcome of individual fungal cell-host encounters within the complexities of in vivo environment.

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Selected Publications

Shlezinger N, Minz A, Gur Y, Hatam I, Dagdas YF, Talbot NJ, Sharon A (2011). Anti-apoptotic machinery protects the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea from host-induced apoptotic-like cell death during plant infection. PLoS Pathog 7:e1002185.

Shlezinger N, Eizner E, Dubinchik S, Minz-Dub A, Tetroashvili R, Reider A, Sharon A (2014). Measurement of apoptosis by SCANĀ©, a system for counting and analysis of fluorescently labelled nuclei. Microbial Cell 1:406-415.

Shlezinger N, Israeli M, Mochly E, Oren-Young L, Zhu W, Sharon A (2016). Translocation from nuclei to cytoplasm is necessary for anti A-PCD activity and turnover of the Type II IAP BcBir1. Molecular Microbiology, 99:393-406.

Shlezinger N, Irmer H, Dhingra S, Beattie SR, Cramer RA, Braus G, Sharon A and Hohl TM. (2017) Sterilizing immunity in the lung relies on targeting fungal apoptotic-like cell death pathways. Science, 6355:1037-1041.

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